blurred past

Kevin just had to get on with the race. 'I was following Wayne and he was having a bit of an easier ride than I was, his bike was working. I was telling myself to sit back and take second. I'd let him get away then I'd be right with him again without trying."

"When I'd catch up without pushing too hard I was thinking that maybe I could win it. Then the back end let go coming out of turn eleven. It wasn't a big fall. I picked the bike up and was going to get it going but then I realised I had done my wrist."

"I had knocked the top off the large bone in the arm at the wrist joint and chipped the other bone." So Laguna Seca virtually finished the teams championship hopes. Kevin Magee was left in a coma, from which he thankfully recovered. He would race again but not as a full time member of the Suzuki team.

Coming and going at the Nurburging. A convincing win over opposition that was even more injured than Kevin. Even before Wayne Gardner fell and badly broke his foot in practice there was talk that the machinery was too fast, too powerful or too something. Honda unveiled plans for a 375cc formula, promoted the use of three cylinder engines and talked of `A' zones and `B' zones of controllable and uncontrollable power. It generated a lot of wry jokes and few solutions. Many pointed to the 103 patents that Honda hold over three cylinder engine design. Wayne Rainey crashed in the final practice session and injured his hand chasing Kevin's pole time that was out of reach by a mile. Kevin was fitter and back on form, helped by a test session at the German track two weeks before. Mick Doohan and Pier Francesco Chili performed their famous synchronized crash early in the race and Kevin was off on his own.


"All the testing and stuff that Kevin did he'd have been a real threat to us for the championship. Any big injury makes you sit back, scratch your head and think how easy it could happen to you, to anybody out there. I guess the year before when Bubba bad gotten hurt I'd experienced the same type of thing. I think Bubba and I are about as close as Kevin and I and it was real tough to see both guys get hurt in similar circumstances one year after the other."

The doctors in the US wanted to put a screw in Kevin's arm but he refused, instead he left for Europe early so that he could spend time at Dr. Costa's clinic in Italy. He had a week at home though during which time he rented a Jet Ski and went out on the lake with his plastered arm wrapped up in a plastic bag.

When he saw Dr. Costa, the Italian changed the plaster so that the arm was bent more in a racing position. After four days like that he changed for a semi-rigid cast and Kevin started a rigorous period of physiotherapy. "The day I got to Italy he X-rayed it and you could still see the break as plain as the day I did it. Saturday evening after practice at Jerez he X-rayed it again and you couldn't even see a crack any more. That was just after ten days of him looking after it."

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